First Trail Race

It has been almost three years since my THR, and I am running the Half-Wit-Half Marathon Trail Run August 13.  This will be my first race since surgery.  All I want to do is make the cut off, so I can finish.  I have been training on the AT south of Boiling Springs, PA.  It is all because of this site, that I am even running again.  The testimonies, the encouragement,  and the sheer determination of all the folks who post here got me to try running again.  Thank you.  After thirty years of running, it was really hard to quit.  Now I am out there again, not as far and not as fast, but out there on the trail again.  Topping it off, I turn sixty five this week, so the race is going to be my birthday present to myself.

8 months in

I’ve been reading about everyone’s recovery and have been a bit jealous because my recovery has been much slower than expected.  My THR was performed 12/08/2016 and I thought I’d be able to run a 5K in 4-6 months.  After all, I’ve run 50 marathons prior to surgery.  I tried to run a few times in May (1 mile) but it was extremely painful and my hip would stiffen up and be sore for 3-4 days.  In the meantime, I’ve been focusing on the bike to keep active.  I usually do a 40-50 mile ride on the weekends.

Lately though, I’ve noticed that my hip has been able to take on my activity.  For example, I’ve started doing box jumps and lunges without pain but more importantly, no lingering pain/stiffness afterwards.

So I ran on the treadmill today.   My goal was 2 miles in 20 minutes but I knew I would need walk breaks.  At first it was difficult to maintain a 10 min/mile pace but after each walk break, it was easier to go faster and I was able to get to a 9 min/mile pace in the final stretch to meet my goal.  The cool thing was that my hip actually felt better after the run than before I started.

I’m still nervous about taking it to the streets so I’ll continue to be cautious for awhile but it looks like I’ll be able to finally join everyone as a hiprunner in the fall.

Eric

Planning for THR

Hi Im 41 years old and was diagnosed with AVN a in July of 2015.  I have “maintained”  over the past few years walking ok even running from time to time.  Shortly after by first doctors appointment and learning of my problem I decided to take the advice of a doctor who was friends with my PMP and he said to hold on as long as possible.  They both believed I was so young that my hip would not last me the rest of my life.

Well 2 years later I think it’s that time.  I have pain walking around and I’m at the point where I don’t want to go out because I fell like I may fall.  I work in IT in an office setting and even that is scary for me now.  I’m was a runner most of my adult life and serious for 3 years before my diagnosis.  I’d like to go back so I’m looking for  suggestions of doctors, clinics, Pre op training, and materials.    I’m not rich but I have good insurance and have been saving so I can travel if need be.

Note: I currently live in the Detroit area.   Thanks in advance for any suggestions.

IT Band issue

I wonder if anyone has had IT Band issues with THR? Probably, right? Okay. I think I have had it or currently have it. I know all the exercises and what happens to cause IT et al, however, because the IT was snipped in surgery, should I be careful putting too much strain on it when stretching etc?

Does or has anyone put their leg under them and laid on it – you know, so your body weight is over the leg? I am deathly afraid of too much contortion because I fear dislocation as much as I fear spiders and Marti Gras.

Thoughts?

Running after hip-resurfacing surgery

Yesterday was the 6-month mark following my hip resurfacing surgery and time for me to start my long up-hill climb to running once again. I jogged for about 8 minutes mixing in some walking.  My hip felt great.  No pain.  Just a lot of sluggishness from inactivity.  I’ve put on 10 pounds.  I eyed the scales as though it were my enemy.  6 months of high-calorie food and drink with minimal workouts and low cardio exercise is a bad routine.  High intake and low output.  But my hip is so much better.  Today I jogged 4 laps around a track with rest in between each lap.  My last lap was 2:29, about a 10-minute pace for a mile.  My energy level is already so much higher with this minimal amount of exercise.  My outlook is already better.  I’m a real believer in hip resurfacing surgery.  It sure has worked for me.  I plan to take a very slow recovery over the next 6 months and build up to a half marathon, then a marathon possibly by next May 2018.

 

Pain in the butt? Literally

Hi all

I’m 5 weeks post surgery from right THR Anterior approach, and doing great.  Been walking all over and using the elliptical, and this week the doctor gave me the go ahead to swim so I’m taking deep water running, and pool boot camp at my gym.  Here is my question…has anyone been experiencing or experienced during their recovery pain in the buttocks?  I think it’s the piriformos muscle?  It kills me.  I have mentioned this to the physical therapist and she said it’s because I’m using muscles I haven’t used in over a year due to my limping and not being able to fully exercise. The hip feels great I’m just having these muscle issues!

Thanks

Cara

Year (+) update

Well, it’s been a year since I posted about being accosted by the gang in blue. My THR was in March 2016. I am a long distance runner who hasn’t run anything long since before my operation. From the start, I planned on getting back to trail running. I had a meteoric improvement for the first 8 months or so, up to 10 miles at a time with maybe 15 or 20 miles for the week. I started trail biking, which was great, first and foremost because it got me out there. There is also some conditioning from cycling and time off of my legs. (Cycling is great! You get to coast all of the downhills, it’s not very hard and you get your miles in less time!–my running friends think that’s funny. My cycling friends, not so much.) My problem was some radiating pain in my thigh, which I took to be the titanium / bone interface there. So I stayed at that level for several months and finally a month or so ago, went to a PT for a running evaluation. He thinks that what I have is adductor tendonopathy, likely a result of my operation. The symptoms fit with that diagnosis. Not a big deal and somewhat common for post THR, he says. The exercises that he gave me are few and simple. First, balance: (the proprioception system gets whacked when you muck around with body parts) Stand on left foot for 30 seconds, then right. Then again. Then stand on left foot and look slowly all the way to your right, and swing your eyes over to your left and back and forth for 30 seconds, then right foot. Then do the first moves again with your eyes closed. Glute strengthening: get a 10″ stool, stand with both feet on it, then dip down backwards with your foot, just barely touching the ground, then back up to the stool (no push off, all leg). Do it a dozen or so times, then do the other foot. Repeat. The exercise that really is showing results for me is with an elastic band. (Green in color, two inches wide and just under 10″ long, unstretched. I got it at the local running store.) Put it around your ankles and scoot to your left 30 feet in 6″ or so increments and then go to your right. Repeat. This has really ‘tightened’ up my hip area. Before, it seemed somewhat ‘loose’ and now it is feeling tighter and more normal and more under my control. Doing that before running has been great. Lastly, use the band around both ankles and balance on one leg (30 seconds) and then the other. I started doing these exercises only 3 times a week, but after only a couple of times I increased and I will probably do them every day or more. (If you can run a mile, why not 26, right?)

I am now trying to push the distance.  I still have at least four 50 mile runs that I need to do before I don’t want to do fifties anymore. So two nights ago, I ran up and down a 3 mile (round trip) paved hill, two times with about 800 feet of climb.   This morning I ran a 13 mile trail (round trip) with about 4,000 feet of climb and maybe more importantly, 4,000 feet of descent.  No issues at this time with my hip.  My biggest problem is that I am slow and out of shape, and I keep remembering when I was young and immortal, running much faster times.  Oh well!  I hope to be at 25 or 30 miles per week on a regular basis by the end of summer.  So far, so good.

By way of pinning me down and hopefully encouraging others by knowing my age, I don’t want to say how old I am (I’m still getting used to the numbers) but I will say that I just got a $700 raise last month, as I qualified for Medicare.  (Some of you will get that right away, others might have to ask some older friends (who pay their own health insurance) what I’m saying.)  Also, I am now a firm believer in wide forefeet and highly cushioned shoes.  I use toe spreaders in the evenings with the goal of getting my feet back in order after many years of running in tight shoes.

Good luck!

gj

 

 

Anyone move to an LCHF lifestyle?

Anyone move to an LCHF lifestyle? Low carbohydrate/high fat eating.

I know, I know, what does this have to do with prosthetics and surgeries et al.

I have been doing a ton of research on this. Many physicians, scientists, researchers have done a complete 180 turn around on supporting the national food guides of Canada, American, South Africa, Australia, England – which all look alike: Heavy on the grains and fruits = heavy on the carbs.

They are pushing for heavy on the fats, low on the carbs and proteins and NO refined carbs.

It’s more about obesity, coronary artery disease, and diabetes, with research still going on about Alzheimer’s, epilepsy, cancer and skin issues, but to me, it is about weight on the prosthetic or the lack of it.

With no increase in exercise, in fact a decline (for now) due to a heavy schedule, I have lost 8 or 9 pounds over less than three weeks.

Thoughts?

I have always known refined carbs to contain no benefit, only a cost.

Anyway….

Need help finding my way. Suggestions wanted?

Hi…..  I am a 65 year old life long runner.  Figure I’ve run around this earth at least once (25,000 miles) in my life and probably a lot more.  Early this year, January, I woke up one morning with a severe pain in my right hip.  I had been on the treadmill running the night before and on the Stair Master almost everyday before that.  I was shocked by the pain that morning and limping very noticeably heading into work.  Since then I’ve been around the block visiting my physician, PT, chiropractor and a sports medicine orthopedic surgeon at the Cleveland Clinic who is an assistant to the Cavaliers.  Bottom line is I need a THR.  In addition, I have talked to several friends who have had successful THR.  Here is my question:  What type of replacement material should I get and which procedure is best for an active person like me?   Surprisingly, my friends had no clue what type of replacement they had.  They just know where the scare is and that they are happy with the result.  Most of the posts on this site take about the procedure, the result and the general type.  But, few posts take about the material the surgeon used.. i.e. metal on metal, ceramic on polyethylene… etc.  For anyone that took the time to look, there are over 40 different medical codes for the different procedures.(http://www.zimmer.com/content/dam/zimmer-web/documents/en-US/pdf/medical-professionals/reimbursement/Coding-Guides/hip-systems-coding-reference-guide.pdf)   Each code is for the type of material, glue and approach.  The Cleveland Clinic surgeon recommended a ceramic on polyethylene THR for me.  But, he said that metal on metal was better for a very active person and may come with potential complications.

So, back to my question:  For those of you who feel your THR has been successful, what type of material and approach did you have?   And, likewise, which materials have you found to be unsuccessful?

Thanks for your input, I look forward to your comments.  –  Kelly