Waiting Game….

optimismquote

 

In my last post I indicated that the MRI for my knee and hip on my right (non-THR) side was finally coming.  That was because on the day I made the post I received word that the MRI was approved and I would eventually be hearing from someone to schedule the MRI.  I got anxious after a few days and finally called them.  They had the order in their system…FINALLY!  Then I learned that the order was only an MRI  for the hip and did not include the knee.  HALT!

I didn’t want the hip to be looked at without the knee, because I really think there is more of an issue with the knee then my doctors think.  So I cancelled the order and called my doctor back asking to get the knee included.  So the waiting process began again.  Ugh.  After a long week of delay, I finally got a new date for my MRI – April 2nd.  So I have waited one whole month since my first appointment to get to this step.  I sincerely hoped I could get it done before all of the summer fun starts…..now I may wait.  We’ll see.

In the meantime, I have stepped up my running again.  Bloomsday is coming.  I am heavily involved with that run.  I coordinate the 2nd Seeded runners for that race.  How can I not run it….as a second seeder?   So despite the knee aggravation I have bumped my weekly mileage into the 30’s and 40’s.  The knee still aches, but i am starting to feel stronger.  Sometimes the THR side hurts, but the pain comes more from piriformis pain than from the hip.  I am sure that I am overcompensating with my THR side due to the soreness of the right knee.  It’s ironic that my THR side would be carrying me through my runs these days.  But that is me.  An optimistic runner.  Not just a runner….a Hip Runner.

 

6 Weeks Post THR update

Hi all!  Today is my 6 week mark.  I am happy with how things are going — I have to admit I am stunned when I read some posts about people doing ‘all activities’ at this point or running not too far from now…Wow!  I guess everyone recovers at different paces and I’m trying hard not to be too jealous.  🙂

PT is going well but I’ve been struggling a bit with a strained hip flexor which has made it hard to do some of the strengthening exercises but patience, patience, patience.   I can walk pretty easily at least mile or so without stopping for a break.

I’m just really stiff most of all — The hip was always tight even before the surgery b/c of years of struggles with the dysplasia.  Question for the group  — for those that had a long-term battle with muscle pain/tightness b/c of either dysplasia or over compensation — Have you also experienced challenges with getting your muscles to try and ‘relax’ and get used to your new, properly aligned hip?

The hip itself doesn’t really seem to hurt at all, it’s just all the muscles that were so tight before are battling to figure out this new configuration.  Would appreciate any feedback/tips.

Thanks all!

 

Which surgery to pick?

Hi guys,

My right hip is degenerating and the pain is getting worse every week.  I was diagnosed 7 years ago at age 30 with dysplastic hips and got both labrums repaired by Dr. Kelly from HSS.  Because of the arthritis, Dr. Kelly is recommending I get a hip resurfacing by Dr. Suh to avoid the THR due to my age and activity level.  I frequently run, lift weights, swim, crossfit, and bang hard.  Would anyone recommend a doctor in NJ or NYC area for a 2nd opinion?  I’m nervous the hip resurfacing won’t fix the stability of the dysplastic hip and I’ll need a THR too soon.  The hip resurfacing is supposed to last 15 to 20 yrs.  Please email me any experience shares or ideas @ finaldid@hotmail.com.  Feedback or advice is welcome!

Thanks,
Damon

32 days

Post THR.  This morning I woke up for the first time and felt I didn’t need any pain meds at all — Not even the Tylenol.  I took a dose before I went to bed and had been taking a dose upon waking to kick the overnight pain out.  Today, a little creaky and stiff, but not real pain and not enough to want meds.

I know it’s a tiny milestone but I’ll take it!  I backed a bit off on my activity; think I was doing too much (even though it felt like barely anything to me) and it has made a world of difference.  Going to the gym in the morning and just doing my PT exercises, some light upper body work and some stretching.  Limiting my stairs/walking a bit as I had a lot of pain/tightness in the front of my hip and that has gone way down.  Will try and increase again maybe in a few days.

Happy Monday everyone!  🙂

 

Counting down the days..

Hi all. I have been following this site for quite some time. I am a 34 year old mother of 5 year old twins and was born with hip dysplasia. I have advanced
osteoarthritis & no more cartilage left in my left hip..I developed a love for running around 30 and miss it so much! I’ve always had pain and knew i was pushing when i would run, but the rush of feeling so alive is what kept me at it. My THR surgery is scheduled for April 3rd at HSS..I’m pretty nervous & hope this is not something i say “what did I get myself into?”, but desperatley want to be someone who says “why did i wait so long?!”…I need to get out of this rut that’s not quite living to me. The pain and inability to do pretty much everything has made me someone I don’t even like. I am trying to get myself into the right mind set for the road ahead and have my THR Tough shirt already!;) Any words of advice?

One more Half Marathon – Just one….

Chris Goodwin giving the thumbs up while helping me to get to finish a sub 1:30 1/2 Marathon
Christopher Goodwin giving the thumbs up while helping me finish a sub 1:30 1/2 Marathon

At my Tuesday Night Workout with the SDP Boys last week, I finally decided that I would run the Snake River 1/2 marathon coming up on the weekend.  My knee and hip are still slowing me down, but I figured, why not get one more in before I have to take a long break.  My teammates started quizzing me about my goal time.  I laughed and told them I was barely able to run 7:00 minute miles right now, but if I ran under 1:30:00 I’d be pretty happy.  I laughed at the thought of holding 6:52’s for 13.1 miles.  That just seemed a bit out of reach right now.  That discussion set the wheels in motion for two of my SDP buddies Bill “Fitz” Fitzner and Christopher Goodwin.  They made it their goal to get me in under 1:30.  The course is an out and back run through the beautiful but windy Snake River Gorge.  At the starting line on the day of the race,  Fitz said, “OK, we’re going out at 7:00 minute pace and at the turn, we’ll step it up to 6:45.”.  Christopher Goodwin nodded in agreement.  “Oooookkk”.  I said, but personally, I thought they’d drop me in the first few miles and I’d stumble my way to the finish happy to complete the half marathon, no matter what.  When the gun went off, we went out faster than I anticipated.  After about 400 meters I looked at my watch and saw that we were running 6:41 pace.  Fitz and Goodwin reigned me in, and we settled into a nice 6:48 pace.  This was actually a better pace for me.  I didn’t think I would have the ability to increase my pace by 15 seconds per mile halfway through the race.  The wind had us running one behind the other down the road, taking turns leading to block the wind and allowing others to draft.  Other friends joined in as we fought off the wind and alternated – I only took the lead once.  I was grateful.  Amazingly, we had maintained 6:48’s up to the turn.    That’s when things started to get harder for me.  Instead of maintaining 6:48’s, I was hitting 6:52’s and 6:53’s.   Fitz and Goodwin were pulling me along.  Occasionally, they would get 5 to 10 yards in front of me before noticing I was falling off.  Goodwin would fall back and encourage me along.  Fitz, the human metronome would keep the goal pace that I needed to break 1:30.  Occasionally he would point to the ground right behind him and yell, “C’mon Tom!” indicating that I should pick up the pace and catch up.  I remember with about 2 miles to go Christopher said, “OK Tom, we have to pick up the pace and catch up with Fitz, let’s do this now”.  The last thing I wanted to do was pick up the pace, but when in Rome…..It hurt but it helped.  Just after passing the 13 mile marker, the watch hit 1:29.  I had a minute to run just under 1 tenth of a mile.  I crossed the line at 1:29:52.  Shew!  I could hardly lift my legs and my  right knee ached like crazy, but thanks to these two SDP brothers (who could have run much faster), I reached my goal.

My MRI has finally been approved.  Today I am going to schedule it to get a better look at the hip and knee.  With any luck I will get the issues taken care of and be back to running the sub 1:25’s like I did last year.  And hopefully, I will be able to pay it forward like these two friends did for me.

 

DarrenO first post – Ceramic or plastic??

Hi All

I’m 40 years old and have finally accepted my fate! I need a new left hip.
I’m hoping to make a return to running (maybe not the marathons of before but hopefully 10ks?)

I’ve been to see a consultant in recent weeks who has suggested I might be able to get back to short distances. He actually suggested that sprint triathlons might be the way to go. I think he was secretly being very conservative as he suggested that many patients feel so good post op that they tend to overdo it.

He has suggested ceramic on plastic for me but now after a lot of research I’m wondering is ceramic on ceramic a better option for my running ambitions? It would be great to hear other people’s opinions and experiences on this?

Thanks in advance

Darren

Peter M – All Clear at 6 Weeks!

Hello All,

I’m ecstatic to report I received the “all-clear” at my 6 week follow up visit with my surgeon yesterday. I am now allowed to resume normal activities. The first thing I did after they told me that was tie my own left shoelace. I hadn’t been able to do that for quite a while. Today, I may be more adventurous and try to cut my toenails. And tomorrow, if this snowstorm subsides, I will try to jog a quarter mile.

Aside from this tightness (I was very stiff even before surgery), my biggest problem is still sleeping at night. I was taking mega doses of oxycodone an hour before bed time. But that didn’t help me sleep, so I gave up the pills (again) about a week ago. I would truly appreciate if anybody out there has any suggestions for sleep aids that don’t involve narcotics, wine, or weed.

I am going to miss my cane. I’ve grown attached to it. People are so much kinder and friendlier when they notice my cane. And I always get a seat on the subway! I will also miss the affinity I have felt with others I have encountered walking with canes. I’ve met at least a half dozen interesting people in the last 6 weeks who have exchanged comments about cane features, styles, walking speeds, gaits, limps, and so on. I guess I still feel an affinity with these less fortunate souls even though I no longer need my cane. I have walked a mile in their shoes and I have had a glimmer of what it is like for them.

Next milestone is in another 6 weeks. They tell me by that time I will be close to “normal” and ready for heavy lifting.

 

Peter M (a/k/a Speedy Petie a/k/a The Hipster)
March 5, 2015

 

20 days post THR and getting better — But still frustration

Hi everyone!  Tomorrow will be 3 weeks since my right THR.  I had my surgical checkup and my doc said I was doing fantastic — walking easily with no cane, incision healing beautifully, etc…

I’ve been doing the home PT and walking a little bit every day, increasing a bit each time.  I only had one setback at the end of last week where I obviously did too much last Friday/Saturday and Saturday my body let me know — a throb and pain in the leg and hip I hadn’t had before.  Took it easy Sun/Mon just doing PT exercises and limited walking and today I feel much better, ready for my first outpatient PT session today and driving again!

The only painful part for me is the back of my knee/leg on the surgical side — Had lots of bruising there and find it is always the most painful and very painful to sleep on it for any period of time — Anyone else have this?

Also, I’m discovering that everyone’s body reacts differently to pain meds — and the process of coming off of them.  I’ve been weaning down off the Tramadol for several days (getting down to only at night) and happy to report I have been only on Tylenol now (which I think does squat but can’t switch to Advil till I finish my Celebrex in about a week) — But I can tell my body is struggling with the removal of the stronger drug.  I’m more easily upset, felt weaker, I don’t feel ‘like myself’ — but it is getting better.  I know not everyone has adverse reactions to pain drugs but this has been a great lesson for me if I ever need pain meds again.

I can relate to Andy’s recent post about tapering Tramadol!  Some of these meds are just so complex it’s hard to know how your body reacts.

Excited for outpatient PT today and ready to push myself!  Thanks for everyone’s great stories.

20 days in and feeling good!

Andy Carmichael

I’m 72 years old and have been running pretty much injury-free for 36 years. Suddenly in late September 2014 the day after a modest little 3 mile run, I was in bad pain down my right side – groin, thigh and leg. For the next two months, I could still walk as much as I liked, but by mid-December, a CT-Scan showed I was almost bone on bone.

Total hip replacement surgery happened February 10, 2015 and even I’m surprised at my speedy recovery. I’ve been driving and walking for 10 days and return to work this week. My surgeon’s delighted and doesn’t want to see me again until April.

It seems my fast decline – going from walking fairly normally to surgery in less than two months – has helped with my recovery. The muscles didn’t get a chance to atrophy and I was able to transition directly from a walker to walking four days after surgery, which my surgeon says is ‘remarkable’.

The only hiccup? When I returned home, I stopped taking Norco (narcotic) and replaced it with Tramadol. It worked fine until I tried to go cold turkey last Friday. Saturday morning, it felt like I had a bad dose of ‘flu plus what I imagine the DTs feel like. When I checked online, it seems to be a typical reaction. So now, I’m tapering over several days and feeling much better.